SMACC

More than a hundred years ago Osler moved medical education to the bedside. Somehow today, most medical education still takes place in the lecture hall far away from patients.

Medical education is often thought of as a top to bottom process where experienced professors and clinicians provide information and feedback to novice learners, with the goal of increasing knowledge and adjusting behavior.

This approach to medical education can be effective, but may also only provide situational learning making what is learned in school today, outdated tomorrow.
Creating an environment where students can learn reflective practice that can evolve with them as they move from novices to experts may prevent situational experts and facilitate expert performance.

The continuous changing nature of modern healthcare also demands that students from an early educational age are provided with the skills needed to learn, work and adapt within a continuously evolving environment. These skills aren’t traditionally taught in medical school as learning in context is limited.

Therefore, the future of medical education should focus on helping students develop the skills needed to become their own learning choreographers who take responsibility for their own education, not only as students but also as lifelong learners as part of their continuous medical education.

The purpose of the talk is to answer some of the question that may arise when you allow medical students to choreograph their own education. How this process can be started with you as the educator, and can be done without compromising patient safety and maybe even improve patient outcome.

Direct download: Sandra_Viggers.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:00am AEST

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